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Why Stop Smoking?

The benefits of stopping smoking

Stopping smoking isn't easy, but when you see the drastic improvements to your life and health, you'll want to get your action plan going as quickly as you can. The damage that smoking causes to your body is extensive, and your secondhand smoke can also cause problems for everybody else too. Smoking is unattractive and costs you loads of money. Just imagine your smokefree future - feeling great and having that extra money in your pocket.

Smoking & your health

Find out more:

Smoking & Heart Disease

  • Smoking & Your Health
  • Smoking & Heart Disease
  • Smoking & Diabetes
  • Smoking & COPD
  • Smoking & Shisha
  • Smoking & Your Pets

Smoking & Your Health

Smoking can impact your health in many different ways. When you stop smoking you will notice the benefits almost immediately.

You will breathe more easily and cough less, have more energy and feel less stressed.

You will be less likely to get sick with colds and flu and will also lower your risk of a heart attack or cancer.

Smoking is unattractive and costs you loads of money. Just imagine your smoke free future – feeling great and having that extra money in your pocket.

Smoking & Heart Disease

Coronary heart disease (CHD) is usually caused by a build-up of fatty deposits on the walls of the arteries around the heart (coronary arteries).

The fatty deposits, called atheroma, are made up of cholesterol and other waste substances.

The build-up of atheroma on the walls of the coronary arteries makes the arteries narrower and restricts the flow of blood to the heart. This process is called atherosclerosis. Your risk of developing atherosclerosis is significantly increased if you smoke.

Smoking & Diabetes

If you've been diagnosed with diabetes, you will need to pay special attention to certain aspects of your lifestyle and health.

Diabetes doesn't have to stop you from leading the life you want. Nor does it mean you'll necessarily have other serious health problems in the future. If you do smoke, find support to help you stop. Smoking increases your risk of heart disease and stroke even further.

Smoking & COPD

Smoking is the main cause of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). COPD is the name for a collection of lung diseases including chronic bronchitis, emphysema and chronic obstructive airways disease. At least 4 out of 5 people who develop the disease are, or have been, smokers. The lining of the airways becomes inflamed and permanently damaged by smoking. This damage cannot be reversed. Around 10-25% of smokers develop COPD.

Smoking & Shisha

A World Health Organisation study has suggested that during one session on a Shisha pipe (around 20 to 80 minutes) a person can inhale the same amount of smoke as a cigarette smoker consuming 100 or more cigarettes. Hookah smoke also contains nicotine, cancer-causing chemicals and toxic gases such as carbon monoxide.

Smoking & Your Pets

Many studies show that second-hand smoking and tobacco exposure increases health risks to your pets and has been associated with:

  • Oral Cancer and Lymphoma in Cats: they lick themselves as part of their grooming and because of this they ingest dangerous carcinogens that are absorbed by their fur
  • Allergies, Nasal Cancer and Lung Cancer in dogs: long nosed dogs have a greater risk of developing nasal cancer while small/medium nose dogs have a greater risk of developing lung cancer.
  • Respiratory problems and Lung Cancer in small furry pets and birds.
  • Fish kept in tanks and aquariums can suffer the effects of second hand smoke as it can introduce toxins into the water in which they live and lead to failure to thrive.
  • Amphibians and Reptiles are sensitive to airborne toxins. Second-hand smoke from cigars and cigarettes can cause chronic eye, skin, and respiratory disease.
  • Your pet is more at risk from passive smoking than humans because they spend more time at home, are usually always found close to their owner and are closer to carpets where carcinogenic particles linger.
  • Smoke lingers on carpets and curtains which makes animals more susceptible to breathing in deadly toxins.
  • If pet owners choose to smoke outside the effect on their pets; although reduced, is not completely eradicated.

Stopping Smoking Timeline

  • 20 minutes

    Blood pressure and pulse rate return to normal

  • 8 hours

    Nicotine and caron monoxide levels in blood reduce by half, oxygen levels return to normal.

  • 24 hours

    Carbon monoxide will be eliminated from the body. Lungs start to clear out mucus and other smoking debris

  • 48 hours

    There is no nicotine. Ability to smell and taste is greatly improved

  • 72 hours

    Breathing becomes easier. Bronchial tubes begin to relax and energy levels increase

  • 2 - 12 weeks

    Your circulation improves.

  • 3 - 9 months

    Coughs, weezing and breathing problems improve as lung function increases by up to 10%.

  • 5 years

    Risk of heart attack falls to about half compared to a person who is still smoking.

  • 10 years

    Risk of lung cancer falls to half that of a smoker. Risk of heart attack falls to the same as one who has never smoked.

20 minutes

Blood pressure and pulse rate return to normal

24 hours

Carbon monoxide will be eliminated from the body. Lungs start to clear out mucus and other smoking debris

72 hours

Breathing becomes easier. Bronchial tubes begin to relax and energy levels increase

3 - 9 months

Coughs, weezing and breathing problems improve as lung function increases by up to 10%.

10 years

Risk of lung cancer falls to half that of a smoker. Risk of heart attack falls to the same as one who has never smoked.

8 hours

Nicotine and caron monoxide levels in blood reduce by half, oxygen levels return to normal.

48 hours

There is no nicotine. Ability to smell and taste is greatly improved

2 - 12 weeks

Your circulation improves.

5 years

Risk of heart attack falls to about half compared to a person who is still smoking.